Helping Children After Community Environmental Disaster

Hi, You and I both know that children need our help. I’m writing to you from my office here in Boulder, CO. I’m a psychotherapist and president of the Colorado Group Psychotherapy Society. I just wanted to ask you this quick question: Are you prepared to emotionally recover from environmental disasters such flooding? You may be prepared in a logistical sense, but I propose this may be a tough one to answer for your childrens sake. I want to sincerely ask you to consider the following.. After a child’s (and teens) immediate needs such as shelter, food, warmth, safety, etc. have been met, the brain is often left cluttered to sort an ‘internal mess’ of ideas and emotions. On top of this, routine and predictability is a huge need to consider, because events like the one I just mentioned above can disrupt everything. These kind of situations push us past traditional understanding and emotional tolerance.. Not to mention, hopelessness and powerlessness can overwhelm children and their sense of safety and belonging will be compromised. Too much uncertainty and chaos following any kind of disaster not only has immediate impacts, but long lasting ones as well. Impacts which you and I can help prevent by accelerating the process of recovery. This is what I specialize in, as well as experiential play therapy, emotional-parent coaching, trauma training and more. But what does this mean for you, you ask? I would like to offer you a free presentation at your school. There’s three major points I want to go over while I’m there.. 1. I want to teach about the natural responses...